Chef’s Table Season 6: Food Media Fatigue?

I don’t *dislike* food TV, even though I’ve published things about Jamie Oliver behaving like a rock star, and devoted several years to being one of its critics. In fact, one of the reasons I care about it at all is that I deeply value food and cooking, and I’ve long been curious and intrigued about the seemingly sudden spell (since circa 1990s) it’s managed to cast on popular attention spans.

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Net Wisdom

Lovely piece by Robert Cotrell in the FT on what a good time it is to be a reader:

‘It is a privilege to earn one’s living by writing but, as I discovered, it is also a privilege, and a less stressful one, to earn one’s living by reading.

My first contention: this is a great time to be a reader. The amount of good writing freely available online far exceeds what even the most dedicated consumer might have hoped to encounter a generation ago within the limits of printed media.

I don’t pretend that everything online is great writing. Let me go further: only 1 per cent is of value to the intelligent general reader, by which I mean the demographic that, in the mainstream media world, might look to the Economist, the Financial Times, Foreign Affairs or the Atlantic for information. Another 4 per cent of the internet counts as entertaining rubbish. The remaining 95 per cent has no redeeming features. But even the 1 per cent of writing by and for the elite is an embarrassment of riches, a horn of plenty, a garden of delights.’